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Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

Nov 19, 2013 -- 10:14am

TODAY'S GENIUS AWARD GOES TO . . . . . . .
    Frederick Selfridge, 61, who now knows, if you're going to steal laptops from work and sell them on eBay, it's probably a good idea not to use an account in your real name. The man helped himself to laptops and gas monitors from his employer for nearly four years. He then sold them on eBay. After an investigation, authorities tracked down the stolen property to Selfridge, who was dumb enough to use his own name as the seller.


AND THEN THERE'S .....
    Brett Russel Thompson, a hunter in Florida, who was outsmarted by a robotic deer used by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission. The robot Bambi, used to catch illegal poachers, snared Thompson after he took a shoot at the faux animal. Thompson was charged with taking deer during closed season, discharging a firearm from a roadway and taking deer from a right-of-way. He faces up to a year in jail and $2,500 in fines if convicted.



OR HOW 'BOUT .....
    An unidentified bicyclist, who learned BMX bikes were never intended to go 50 MPH. A video shows the cyclist holding on to the side of his friend's vehicle while going 50 MPH. Unfortunately the video also shows the man's tires smoking and eventually blowing out causing the daredevil to wipe out. File that under, "It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time."


OKAY, ONE MORE .....
    Wilsly Dudley Lacroix, 25, who apparently didn't like the rule of putting his weights back after using them at a fitness center, so he threatened an employee. Lacroix, pulled up to the front of the fitness center and motioned to the trainer to come over. Lacrois pulled out a gun, cocked a round in the chamber and told the trainer he was going to "pistol whip him." The trainer ran into the gym as Lacroix took off. The trainer told police he argued with Lacroix the day before about not putting weights away. The angry gym patron was arrested and charged with aggravated assault.

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